What’s the difference between a Preacher, Priest, Pastor, Rabbi, Reverend, Deacon, Bishop, Minister, & Pope?

Mother Pistis SophiaThere are so many different kinds of churches, sects, denominations, Spiritual Temples, Healing Centers, etc. yet, the New Age movement has caused a change in how people view certain leadership roles of the Spiritual Community in Christ.  To make things a little easier, we have listed what the various Spiritual leader roles are below.  Each ‘Leadership’ roles has a strong concept and foundation based in Christ and Christ Consciousness.  There are people who have taken the title of Reverend or Ordained Minister, who have the knowledge of and secrets of the Sacred Feminine, yet lack knowledge of Christ Consciousness and vice versa.  For in Spirituality, you can not have the Christ Father without the Holy Mother or knowledge of the Divine Masculine with out the Wisdom of the Divine Feminine as ‘One.’  If one leans more towards the other, than the whole Community, Church, Healing Center, etc. becomes out of balance.  Please see the list of the Spiritual ‘Leadership’ roles below.

A ‘Reverend’ is a term of respect for some ministers. It is often used in the ‘Anglican’ church as a name or title for their vicars/pastors.

A ‘Pastor’ just means a shepherd. This can be used to refer to anyone who is responsible for the well-being of others (their ‘flock’). ‘Pastoral care’ is a common phrase in education.  For example, it is most commonly used in ‘Protestant’ churches to refer to people in charge, but Catholics also commonly use it to refer to a parish priest.

A Rabbi is a Jewish Minister.

A preacher is someone who preaches. It is commonly used to refer to a leader in the sort of ‘Protestant’ church where preaching and singing are the only activities at the service.

Deacons, priests, and bishops are ‘Ordained Ministers.’  Within the ‘Catholic’ and ‘Orthodox’ Churches, they are the Ordained roles.  A ‘deacon’ is Ordained (by laying on of hands by a bishop) and can fulfill certain special roles during the Mass/Divine Service as well as helping with some of the typical duties of the ordained ministers.  A ‘priest’ is Ordained (by laying on of hands by a bishop, they have usually been a deacon first) and can celebrate the Mass as well as administer certain Sacraments. A bishop is ordained (by laying on of hands, usually by at least 3 bishops to make Apostolic Succession certain) and can administer all the Sacraments and has a diocese (a larger group of many parishes) that they are responsible for putting them in charge of several priests.

The ‘Pope’ is a colloquial term derived from ‘papa’ or ‘father’.  It is commonly used to refer to the Bishop of Rome, who sits in the Throne of St Peter.  It has occasionally been used to refer to other bishops in charge of particular Churches. The Bishop of Rome is in charge of the Roman Church, which covers the whole Latin part of the Catholic Church. He is also first among the bishops of all the Particular Churches in the Catholic Church (the Roman Catholic Church is the largest), making the Pople the earthly head of the Catholic Church.

In this day in age, many, but not all, who take Spiritual Leadership titles and roles have not yet tamed their ego, or ‘Shadow’ self, which is one of the steps when wanting to fully immerse oneself in the Love of Christ Consciousness.  Many carry one or more of the seven deadly thought forms (Pride, Envy, Gluttony, Lust, Anger, Greed, or Sloth) within their being, infecting their followers like a rampant virus.  They allow themselves to be drunk in the delights of carnal desires, rather than being immersed in the Love and Light of Christ.

This is why Christ Yeshua ben Joseph stated, ‘many will come in the name of Christ and will lead many astray!’

~The Christ Council~

Valentina Marie: Owner of The Soul Intention, LLC, Ordained Minister, Dr. of Metaphysics, Dr. of Divinity, CMT, HHP, Reiki Master, Published Author of The Truth Within: Book of Light & Love

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